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The Cambridge Tree Trust is active in promoting the planting, and protection of trees and the beautification of the entrances to the Town.

The Waipa District Council supports the policy of a protected tree list to preserve, protect and enhance the character and visual quality of Cambridge.

heritage Tree Trail Map


 

  1. Some of the trees along Victoria Street were planted in 1880 and around the Town square in 1886.
  2. Dawn Redwood. This species, on the Dick Street side of the square, was believed to be extinct until rediscovered in China in 1948.
  3. Spanish Chestnut. (Recently removed)
  4. Japanese Momi fir planted in 1905 by Neville Souter. The largest known specimen in the North Island.
  5. Box Elder behind the Masonic Hotel.
  6. On the Corner of Empire and Queen Streets were 12 English Oaks planted by Thomas Wells in 1881. The remaining 10 of these now grace Countdown's carpark.
  7. Railway reserve entrance Ginkgo Bilboa
  8. Camellia Grove planted 1962.
  9. Te Koutu Entrance. Eucalyptus planted 1885 and Kauri planted in 1958.
  10. Japanese Maple. The sole remainder of several donated by early missionaries. Seedlings from this tree have been planted throughout town.
  11. The Evergreen Oak by the Large Rhododendron has been raised from the seed of a missionary tree.
  12. Pollard Holme Oak by the bowling club steps was planted in the early 1950's.
  13. Fan Palm near the band rotunda was planted in the early 1900's.
  14. Cedar of Lebanon by the Memorial gates.
  15. Italian Cypress in Saint Andrews Grounds grown from seeds bought from the garden of Gesthemane by Cynthia and Basil Hewett in 1956.
  16. Camellia 'Pillida' planted soon after the founding of Cambridge in 1864. Featured in Colonel Tom Durrant's 'Book of Camellias'

 

In 2002, an Arboriculture student, John Reid, identified 52 notable trees in and around Cambridge.  The Waipa District Council has its own list, which includes most of John's, but adds those considered notable by its own arborists since 2002, and extends the area under consideration.  The Tree Trust is checking both works to update them.  We already know that some trees have been removed through death, disease or bad siting.

The soft, sandy pumice soil around Lake Te Ko Utu has proven unable to hold big trees. Several have fallen in recent winters. In 2013, the Waipa District Council started  implementing a plan to remove them and replace them with more suitable species. One such collapse killed a dog and missed its owner by the length of the leash.

 Clicking on a picture below produces larger images as a slide show.

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  • Bank account for donations: Kiwibank, 38-9005-0635102-01

The 3-minute video below shows what we can do with your donations. Click the "play" arrow, then the "full screen" box at the bottom right of the  picture and the video will play in high definition.

 

Notable Trees of Cambridge

  • Plane trees of Hall St. The London Plane (Platanus x acerifolia), is the basis for early town planting in Cambridge. It is a hybrid of the Eastern plane of Turkey and the Western plane of the Americas.
  • Plane trees of Hall St. The London Plane (Platanus x acerifolia), is the basis for early town planting in Cambridge. It is a hybrid of the Eastern plane of Turkey and the Western plane of the Americas.
  • 1. Spanish Fir, 25 Clare St. Aged about 40 years in 2014. A rare tree in Cambridge.
  • 2. Scarlet Oak, 59 Bowen St. A large, broadly-spreading tree, covering most of the front of the section. Located on private property at 59 Bowen st.
  • 3. Trident Maple, 35 Robinson St. This species is uncommon in NZ, and this one was probably planted in 1969. Located on the street verge outside 35 Robinson St.
  • 4. At 22 Robinson St. This magnificent specimen is on private property at the back of #22 Robinson St.
  • 5. English Oak, opp. 1A Bracken St. This tree was probably planted in 1888 when the Town Belt was formed. It is one of several large English Oaks in Cambridge. A street tree, located opp. 1A Bracken St.
  • 6. English Oak, Cambridge Rd., 5th from Bracken St. This tree also dates from the original Town Belt planting in 1888. It is a street tree, 5th along Cambridge Road from Bracken St.
  • 7. Beech, 104 Carlyle St. Now over a century old, this tree is one of the original planting in this street. It is an excellent example of its species. Located on the town Belt opp. 104 Carlyle St.
  • 8. Narrow-leaved Ash, 43 Carlyle St. This tree was probably planted in 1905, when the whole length of Carlyle St. was planted. Located on the Town Belt opp. 43 Carlyle St.
  • 9. Silver Maple, 9 Carlyle St. Another of the original plantings in Carlyle St. It is larger than any other recorded Silver Maple in NZ. Located on the Town Belt opp. 9 Carlyle St.
  • 10. Silver Maple, 35 Carlyle St. The smaller of 2 growing in Carlyle St., but the better specimen and still larger than any other recorded specimen in NZ. Located on the Town Belt opp. 35 Carlyle St.
  • 11. Pepper Tree, behind 60 Chaucer St. An excellent example of the species.
  • 12. Golden Elm, 1 Coleridge St., nearest to house. These elms are among the first in the country, and are among the largest recorded in NZ. A street tree, located nearest to the house at 1 Coleridge St.
  • 13. Golden Elm, 1 Coleridge St., on corner. This is the golden elm closest to Pope Terrace. These elms are among the earliest brought into NZ, and are among the largest recorded here.
  • 14. Coleridge St. Coleridge St. in early Autumn, 2014. Photo taken from the Pope Terrace end.
  • 15. Box Elder, Duke St. carpark This is a large tree for its species; among the largest in NZ. Located in the carpark behind the Masonic Hotel in Duke St.
  • 16. Red Oak, 4 Dick St. This is the last Red Oak in this street. The others were removed in 2000 because they were becoming hazardous. Located on the street verge outside 4 Dick St.
  • 17. Red Oak, 4 Dick St. close-up Here's a closer view of the tree outside 4 Dick St. It spreads almost wholly across the road.
  • 18. Sweet Chestnut, 102 Hall St. In august 1939, Planes, Chestnuts and Silver Birches were planted along Hall St. This would be one of those plantings. This is the best specimen of Sweet Chestnut in the street, and one of several excellent specimens in Cambridge.
  • 19. English Oak, corner Hamilton & Bryce Streets In 1930 the Cambridge Borough Council planted trees along Bryce and Clare Streets. These were mainly Spanish Chestnuts, Pittosporum and Silver Birch, but it is possible that this tree was also planted then. It is an excellent example of an English Oak.
  • 20. Lime, corner Hamilton & Hall Streets. The Borough Council planted trees in this part of the street in 1905. This is the best specimen of the Common Lime in the street. The photo was taken in mid-May, so a lot of the leaves have fallen.
  • 21. Foxglove Tree at Cambridge Grain, Hannon Rd. John Reid's mother planted this. It's a good example of its species.
  • 22. Walnut 23 Kelly Rd This tree is the last of a stand of Walnuts that was growing here. It is larger than any other Common Walnut recorded in Cambridge.
  • 23. English Oak 159 Lamb St. The town Belt was formed in 1888 and it is likely that this tree was planted about then. It has evidently been pollarded in the past.
  • 24. English Oak corner Lamb St. & Scott St. Another of the Town Belt trees dating from about 1888. Again, it was pollarded in the past.
  • 25. Maple. corner Shakespeare & Thompson Sts. This is a particularly prominent example of a Japanese Maple. There are several of them in Cambridge, and this one really stands out.
  • 27. Tulip Tree 451 Peake Rd. This tree may well date from the building of the house, 1855. It has the largest trunk diameter of its species in NZ, and is also among the tallest.
  • 28. Plane , 14 Stafford St. A tree which has grown to be notable in the 12 years since John Reid did his work on notable trees in Cambridge.
  • 29. Sweet Chestnut, 74 Shakespeare St. A fine, broad-spreading tree, one of many large chestnuts in Cambridge.
  • 30. Japanese Green Oak, 24 Stafford St. This is the only recorded specimen of Japanese Green Oak in Cambridge. There may be others growing unrecorded.
  • 31. Scotch Elm, 26 Taylor St. This is possibly an original planting on the Town Belt in 1888. It is possibly the largest of its species in Cambridge. It is showing its age, and was difficult to photograph well.
  • 32. Sweet Chestnut, 20 Taylor St. One of several impressive chestnut trees growing in Cambridge.
  • 33. Sweet Chestnut, Trotting Club, Taylor St. A large, spectacular tree.
  • 34. Hall St., May 2014. A view along Hall St. There are many sizeable trees here.
  • 35. Douglas Fir, Thornton Rd. This tree is possibly one of the original plantings from 1884. It is a large, multi-leaded tree. One of its original 4 leaders has been removed. It has a trunk diameter at ground level of almost 2m.
  • 36. Sydney Bluegums, Te Ko Utu Park carpark. In 1885, gum trees were planted near the railway. This tree is likely to have been one of them.
  • 37. London Plane, North side of Te Ko Utu Park. There are several notable London Planes in Te Ko Utu Park. They probably originate from the Park's establishment in 1884.
  • 38. London Plane, North side Te Ko Utu Park. Another of several notable London Planes in Te Ko Utu Park. They probably originate from the Park's establishment in 1884.
  • 39. London Plane, North side Te Ko Utu Park. These trees have been left to grow,and are spectacular in autumn.
  • 40. London Plane, North side Te Ko Utu Park. Another example of the splendid specimens around the lake.
  • 41. London Plane, North side Te Ko Utu Park. There are several notable London Planes in Te Ko Utu Park. They probably originate from the Park's establishment in 1884.
  • 42. Douglas Fir, South side of Te Ko Utu Park. Another of the trees originally planted in 1884.
  • 43. Douglas Fir, South side of Te Ko Utu Park. Another of several Douglas Firs probably dating from the original planting in 1884.
  • 44. Douglas Fir, South side of Te Ko Utu Park. This is in John Reids' book in a photo where the tree stands out more. Growth of other trees in the 12 years since, has hampered the view.
  • 45. Gum trees behind the bowling club, including Brown Barrel variety. The largest of this group was possibly planted in 1885, at the same time as the eucalypts on the other side of the park and which are now dangerous.
  • 46. Turkey Oak. 120 Wordsworth St., by Leamington Cemetery. This is possibly one of several trees that were planted in 1905. It is the largest recorded Turkey Oak growing in NZ.
  • 58. Japanese maple, Thornton Rd. In 1877 some missionaries donated three Janpanese maples to Cambridge. These were the parents of many such trees lining Thornton Rd., Hamilton Rd., and others. This last surviving tree stands at the western end of the tennis courts on Thornton Rd.
  • 47. English oaks by Countdown's carpark On the Corner of Empire and Queen Streets are 10 English Oaks planted by Thomas Wells in 1881. These now grace Countdown's carpark, on both street frontages.
  • 48. English oaks by Countdown's carpark. 10 remain out of the 12 originally planted.
  • 49. Rimu by the railway reserve This rimu stands on a development site that used to be a railway reserve.
  • 50. Ginko bilboa (female) This female tree is officially protected. The nuts inside the fruit are edible, especially roasted and salted, and this tree provides an uncommon taste treat. Get them before they rot.
  • 51. Cedar of Lebanon at Te Ko Utu Park This tree is close to a gate built in memory of the first chairman of the Cambridge Domain Board, before the town was even a borough. The tree was planted from seed brought from Lebanon after WW1.
  • Foggy, foggy dew An outstanding specimen of a tilia ( common lime or linden) silhouetted against fog.
  • 26. Lindsay Park, May 2014 This is a general view of the park in May 2014. There are several trees in the vicinity that are worth attention.
  • 53. Michelia 37 Hannon St A magnificent specimen.
  • 54. Liriodendron (Tulip Tree) In front of Cambridge Primary School. Liriodendrons are part of the magnolia family, and hail from the USA. They can reach 70 metres in height.
  • 55. Redwood at Lake Te Ko Utu One of the trees planted in the 1880s. There is also a younger grove, planted in the 1960s.
  • 56. Copper beech in Bowen St. These large purple trees (and their green siblings) dignify a number of parks and private gardens in Cambridge. The one shown is a protected tree on a Bowen Street property.
  • 57. Momi Fir and Himalayan Spruce Japanese momi fir (Abies firma) is on the left side of the photo. Native to Japan, it grows on mountainous slopes up to an altitude of 1600m. Himalayan or Morinda spruce (Picea smithiana) Native to the Himalayas this spruce is found at altitudes of 2400 – 3600 m, so it is rather out of its comfort zone in Cambridge.
  • 58. Japanese maple, Thornton Rd. In 1877 some missionaries donated three Janpanese maples to Cambridge. These were the parents of many such trees lining Thornton Rd., Hamilton Rd., and others. This last surviving tree stands at the western end of the tennis courts on Thornton Rd.
  • 59. Dawn Redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides is a fast-growing deciduous conifer that can grow to 60 metres. Its light green ferny spring foliage turns coppery in autumn. This tree is in Lauriston Park. The species was thought to have died out until 3 were found in China in 1941. Since 1948, seed-grown specimens have been widely planted in temperate areas.
  • 60. Swamp cypress These deciduous conifers are native to North America and grow from Florida to Canada. They are long-lived. The oldest is about 1700 years. The ones around Lake Te Ko Utu are best viewed from the Camelia Walk at the top of the opposite bank.